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Gita B Kapur
Law Pay

Get immediate help with your immigration issue.
Call 213-784-6598 to arrange a time to talk

Gita B Kapur

Get immediate help with your immigration issue.
Call 213-784-6598 to arrange a time to talk

Crimes that can lead to your deportation from the U.S 

Crimes that can lead to your deportation from the U.S 

On Behalf of | May 11, 2022 | Immigration

If you are an immigrant living on any visa in the United States, you may not enjoy all the privileges that come with full citizenship. 

Until you are a naturalized citizen of the United States, certain criminal convictions may result in your removal from the country. Here are some of the deportable convictions that can lead to deportation:

Crimes of moral turpitude

Crimes of moral turpitude can be quite complex. However, the court defines these crimes as offenses that corrupt the basic duties individuals owe to each other as well as toward general society. 

Offenses that fall under crimes of moral turpitude include assault with a deadly weapon, arson, fraud, murder, rape, repeat felonies and drug trafficking among others. 

Aggravated felonies

A conviction for an aggravated felony can earn you deportation from the United States. Unlike a crime of moral turpitude that must be defined by the court, an aggravated felony is clearly defined by the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). 

Some of the aggravated felonies that may lead to deportation include rape, murder, sexually assaulting a minor, fraud, firearm trafficking and money laundering.

A conviction for domestic violence

You can also be deported from the U.S for committing crimes that relate to domestic violence. In fact, a single domestic violence conviction might as well earn you a one-way ticket out of the country. 

According to INA, domestic violence crimes may include spousal assault, child abuse as well as violation of an existing restraining order. 

A criminal offense can impact your status as a resident of the United States. Fortunately, knowing your rights as a U.S resident can help you defend yourself and get a favorable outcome if you have been accused of a crime.